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Prolotherapy

Prolotherapy

Proliferative Therapy, most commonly referred to as Prolotherapy, is a procedure where a medication is injected directly into a body part in order to help regenerate tissue and relieve pain. The musculoskeletal area of the body which receives the injection–often a joint–will experience a targeted treatment that is not possible with oral medications and other therapies.

Prolotherapy helps to strengthen ligaments, relieve pain, and hasten healing time of a serious wound due to reduction of inflammation. It has been shown to help patients with osteoarthritis, joint sprains and other sports related injuries, wounds or injuries from accidents, degenerative disc disease, and other conditions that cause chronic pain or immobility. Prolotherapy can also be used in conjunction with PRP Therapy.

If you are suffering from chronic pain in your joints from an accident, injury, or arthritis, you may eligible for treatment with Prolotherapy. Contact us today, and take the first step in recovering from chronic

Prolotherapy, also known as “proliferative therapy”, involves the injection of dextrose and other medications in order to stimulate a healing response in a chronically injured ligament, tendon or joint.  The treatment results in ligament strengthening, improved stability and pain relief in patients with osteoarthritis, ligament sprains and sports related injuries.  More recently, traditional prolotherapy techniques are used with platelet rich plasma to expedite healing.

Prolotherapy was first described by Dr. Earl Gedney in 1937, an osteopathic physician and surgeon after he treated his own injured thumb.  He would later develop treatment techniques for the lower back and sacroiliac joints.  Prolotherapy is now practiced by physicians around the world for a host of different conditions.  Scientific studies have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of tendinopathy, ligament sprains, tennis elbow, joint laxity, plantar fasciosis and osteoarthritis.